An Open Letter to Amazon KDP Regarding Paperbacks

An Open Letter to KDP,

Amazon began as a bookseller, first and foremost. A purveyor of books. Then CreateSpace made it possible to publish professional-standard books affordably as an author. I have been a faithful customer since the beginning of Amazon. Both companies packed and shipped books beautifully and cared about the product they delivered.

CreateSpace is no more, and we are being forced to use Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) for paperbacks. KDP is shipping paperback books carelessly and thoughtlessly. All of the individual author copies arrive damaged, having been loosely plopped into an envelope and sent through the mail. No pride in product or care for the authors, or the very books that were the company’s humble beginning.

This is a true letdown and downgrade of a product I have always admired, supported, and endorsed on Social Media and to other writers and publishing professionals.

I truly hope KDP will consider a company-wide policy change in the care you take shipping KDP paperback books.

Otherwise, I will have to take my business elsewhere, and heartily endorse that other authors, small presses, and industry professionals do the same.

Regards,

Lana Hechtman Ayers, author and small press publisher

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Interview with Author Loren Rhoads

I’m excited to host an interview with author Loren Rhoads here today.

loren

Most writers I know were starry-eyed readers as children. What do you recall about the first stories that captivated your heart?

peter pan

My mom used to read books to my brother and me at bedtime.  The first one I remember falling in love with was Peter Pan.

dirt hills

 

I’m not sure what about the story intrigued me initially, but when I was four, my family moved to a brand-new house built in the middle of one of my grandmother’s fields.  There wasn’t any yard, then, just piles of dirt dug out for the basment. All around the house rose these little hillocks, covered in willows and weeds and wildflowers.

wildflower

Everything seemed feral, like something out of Neverland. My brother and I acted out our own Neverland adventures.  We were so disappointed when the steamroller finally came and smoothed everything out for a yard.

house flat

When did you start writing your own stories?

writing story

I’m not sure when I first started writing things down, but I remember when I started to tell myself stories.

 

My mom was a firm believer in naps. She was in her 20s, working full-time as an English teacher, with two kids under 5. She may have needed a nap more than we did.

napping

In order to get us to settle down, my mom made my brother and me get in her big bed with her.  I had to hold still so they could sleep.  I passed the time making up stories.  They were about mermaids, like the puppet Marina in the Stingray show on TV.

marina

What made you keep going?

girls

When I was in junior high, I met some girls who actually wrote their stories down so they could pass them around.  We didn’t think of ourselves as writers, really.  We just wanted to share the stories we had in our heads.  Sharing stories was a revelation for me.

imagination

I loved that I could create pictures that would live inside someone else’s imagination.  I took my first creative writing class in high school.  After that, I took every writing class I could find.

publish

What was the path to publication like for you?

long road

It’s been a long road.  I published my first stories in the 1980s, after I went to the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Workshop.

clarion

Soon after that, I had a teacher who discouraged me from writing science fiction, so I turned to horror.  The horror community was so much more welcoming.

horror

Since then, my short stories have ranged from erotic horror to science fiction to urban fantasy, while my novels have been space opera and a succubus/angel love story.  I’ve written a couple of nonfiction books about cemeteries, too.

spec

What was the best writing / publishing advice you ever received?

Ray Bradbury photographed in his office in 1987.
Ray Bradbury photographed in his office in 1987.

Years ago, I met Ray Bradbury, my writing idol, at a book signing in San Francisco. I told him I was struggling with my first novel because I felt like I had to know everything before I could write a word.  I felt like I needed to be an expert.

 just write

He told me not to think about it so much.  “Just write,” he said.  “You’ll find out what you need to know as you’re writing.  Don’t think so much.” He was so very right. I’ve been a pantser ever since.

write freely

Was there any unhelpful or bad advice you can steer hopeful writers away from?

 write dont know

I hate “Write what you know.”  What you know can be boring.  Write to find out what you think. Write to discover things you want to know more about.  Write what you’re interested in.

 experiment

What would you like readers to know about your work?

cover

My latest project has been a series of short stories about a witch who travels the world to find monsters. Her stories combine my love of travel with the old “psychic detective” stories.  I’ve released three short collections on Amazon and plan an omnibus paperback edition of them for the fall.

Here’s the link to the first collection: Alondra’s Experiments

Nancy Kilpatrickauthor of_Thrones of Blood seriesPower of the Blood series (2)

What question do you wish I would have asked that I didn’t?

 camp

What am I working on now?  I’m glad you asked!

I’m editing a charity anthology for my local Horror Writers Association group.  The book is called Tales for the Camp Fire.  We’ll be selling them to raise money for survivors of last year’s devastating wildfire, the most devastating natural disaster in modern California history.  The book should be out in May. I am really excited about the caliber of the work in it.

199cemeteries_1a

To learn more about Loren Rhoads online,check out her site: lorenrhoads.com/

king

Thanks for stopping by! Happy writing & reading all.

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So Now What?–Getting Over the Post Book Release Blues

So now what? That’s what I am asking myself.

My first ever novel is a fait accompli. Saturday, July 7th was the official release day for my romantic time travel adventure novel, Time Flash: Another Me.

pile of books

(where to get a copy of Lana’s book)

Truth is, I should have known the answer.

I’ve had 9 poetry collections published to date–6 full-length and 3 chapbooks.

And each time, I was thrilled. And my friends were thrilled. And there was incredible buzz.

excited

I gave readings and shook hands and sold a few books.

But then, there was this huge sense of deflation–the post book release blues.

This giant now what?

deflated

How could I keep the excitement for marketing my books alive after the first couple of weeks?

How could I keep telling people my poems are something they should care about?

passion led

Well, the first thing I needed to do was remind myself that the words I put together in those books arose out of my deep passion.

And that passion to create remains alive in the words.

And those passionate words are meant to be shared, to connect, to embrace, and hopefully inspire others to create as well.

Inspire

So with the novel, as with the poetry books, I need to stay impassioned, stay positive, keep believing.

And I do believe in the magic and power of books.

Books by others have transported me and transformed me.

books magic

I need to believe my own words can do that too, for others.

(Yes, I truly believe my novel can bring delight!)

delight

And I need to stop feeling like a failure because my book isn’t instantly flying off the shelves or getting hundreds of 5-star reviews.

failure tiles

Putting a book into the world is always a long haul.

The words will be there for others when they need or want them.

They just might not want them right now.

We found out about this magical library from my Wallpaper City Guide for Stockholm. There's something beautiful about piles and piles of books and my inner compulsive sorter took great satisfaction in knowing that they were all perfectly categorized and laid out.

The marketing part of being a writer is the hardest for me.

I need to say in various and creative ways that my book may be a wonderful book for the reader.

And I may need to say it more than once for the reader to notice.

repeat

But I also need to keep to writing.

And keep believing the next story, the next poem, the next words matter too.

It can feel like an impossible balance–the marketing and the writing and the believing.

balance

But living a creative life is such a gift.

Being able to metamorphose your imaginings into something that truly exists for others to experience in the world is wonderful, indeed.

real

As long as I remember that wonder, I can stop feeling disheartened, and keep on going, one word after another.

power

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“Didn’t everyone standing in a crowded elevator imagine how someone could be murdered?”– author V. M. Burns

I’m so excited to have my favorite Cozy Mystery author

and now dear friend

V. M. Burns visit me here on my blog.

valerie

She talks about how she came to write such wonderful mysteries

valerie book 1

and gives fellow aspiring authors the wisdom of her experience.

valerie book 2

Why cozy mysteries?

I’ve loved cozy mysteries for as long as I can remember.

From Encyclopedia Brown and Nancy Drew to Agatha Christie, I love reading and figuring out whodunit.

nancy drew

How did you come to write cozies?

The transition from reading cozies to wanting to write them was subtle.

I don’t recall saying, “one day, I’m going to write cozy mysteries.”

However, there were two glaringly obvious clues which pointed to career as a writer.

clue

First, I mentally altered book/movie endings.

For as long as I can remember, I indulged in what I called, “my imaginings.”

If I finished a book and didn’t like the ending, I changed it.

could have

If I watched a movie and thought the characters should have behaved differently, I “imagined” an alternative.

Or, if I read a book and wanted to know what happened next, I imagined the sequel.

to be cont

At the time, I had no idea this would lead to a life as a writer.

I thought everyone came up with ideas for books/movies or thought out alternative endings and sequels.

Didn’t everyone standing in a crowded elevator imagine how someone could be murdered?

elevator

In addition to an active imagination, I also kept a mental “I wish there was a book” list.

wish list

I wish there was a book about a woman who owned a mystery bookstore who solved mysteries.

I wish there was a book about a policeman and his godmother who solved murders.

I wish…well, you get the idea.

wishing

One day, I told a screenwriter friend, one time too many, that she should write a screenplay about…

That’s when she suggested I should write it myself.

make it so 2

Once the seed was planted, I couldn’t dig it out.

I got every book I could find about writing.

book-tree

Initially, I wrote screenplays and children’s books. I attended conferences and workshops and I wrote.

I completed four screenplays and two children’s books.

Unfortunately, no one was interested in producing my screenplays or publishing my children’s books. I got a lot of rejections.

rejection 1

I still read cozies and decided to write my first cozy screenplay, “Agatha and the Mysterious Museum Murder.”

Yep, no one was interested in that one either.

Hollywood is hard to break into, especially from Indiana.

rejection 2

A series of events led me to the Maui Writer’s Conference where I met book authors and publishers.

maui

At the conference, I pitched an idea for a book to a big five publisher and guess what?

She liked it.

The only problem, I hadn’t finished the book. So, I went home and wrote my first cozy mystery.

Thankfully, I write quickly. So, I finished the book and thought, my road to publication was secure.

road to pub

Uh…no. The publisher only accepted manuscripts submitted by an agent.

I sent queries to agents and got rejection after rejection.

rejected

Eventually, I got an agent who sent my manuscript to the big five publisher, who rejected my manuscript.

rejection quote 3

How did you keep going in the face of rejection upon rejection?

At this point, I knew what I wanted to do with my life.

I wanted to be a mystery writer.

So, I continued to send queries.

rejection quote 4

What was your road to publication like?

“I revised my manuscript and I wrote the next book in the series.

red herring

Years passed and I racked up a lot of rejections.

Obviously, I needed to do something different.

rejection quote 5

One day, while glancing at the bio of one of my favorite cozy mystery writers, Victoria Thompson, I noted she was an adjunct professor at Seton Hill University in Greensburg, PA.

Ever heard of it? Me neither.

seton hill u

A little research showed that Seton Hill had a low residency MFA program in Writing Popular Fiction.

I applied and was accepted. That’s where I found my Tribe.

the tribe

I learned how to write and I rewrote my book.

Since I write quickly, I even started a new mystery series (Mystery Bookshop Mystery).

novel art

MFA degree in hand, I sent queries to agents, editors and publishers and guess what?

I got more rejections.

Nevertheless, I kept writing.

rejection quote 6

Eventually, I got an agent who sold the second manuscript to a publisher who asked if I’d write a proposal for another mystery series.

Heck, yeah.

yes-finally

I also sold my first book to a different publisher.

trav

When all was said and done, I was under contract to write fourteen books!

Yes, you read that correctly, 14!

acceptance-journey

What advice would you give other aspiring writers?

So, what’s the key to my publication success?

I kept writing. I didn’t give up because of a rejection or two or three hundred.

My road to publication was long and rocky with lots of bends, but persistence pays off.

rejection-isnt-failure-failure-is

My advice to aspiring authors, don’t give up and no matter what happens, just keep writing.

just keep writing

V. M. Burns author page  — check out V. M. Burns’ author page to see all her books!

And check out her own blog here V. M. web site

 

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The Best Laid Plans…

My sweet husband decided that the publication of my very first novel deserved to be celebrated.

In grand style!

entrance to golf course

So my husband rented a small function room at our local golf course.

And we invited our neighbors and friends here in Tillamook to come share a delicious salmon dinner.

salmon

My hubby even had this nearly life-sized blow up of my book cover made up to decorate the room for the celebration.

Andy with sign smaller

It was going to be a wonderful celebration.

And for once, I wasn’t even nervous about having to be the center of attention–like I always am when I have to stand up in front of a room full of people.

nervous

When my first poetry collection came out, I seriously considered hiring a stunt double to give the readings for me.

look alikes

(okay, I don’l look like Bowie or Tilda, but you get the idea)

But this time, I was genuinely excited and wanted to celebrate, even if I was going to read a snippet from the book.

snippet

I picked out a polka dot dress to wear because it seemed fun for the occasion without being too formal.

And a purple lace bolero to wear over it.

polka dot dresspurple

But you read the title of this post, so you know something went awry.

The party went off without a hitch. People had a lovely time. So what went wrong?

party goers

Well, only the fact that I couldn’t attend my own party!

Nope.

My body decided to betray me in the wee hours of the morning the day of my party

with excruciating pain.

I ended up in the hospital.

emergency room

I’m doing better now, after a couple of days in the hospital getting test after test after test.

Diagnosed with an intestinal blockage, I’m recovering slowly.

I may need exploratory surgery if things don’t completely resolve on their own. Hope not.

no surgery

But for now, I’m okay.

Except I’m completely, totally, thoroughly bummed

that I missed my own book celebration party.

sad baby

My first thought was I didn’t deserve a celebration, anyway.

My second thought, too.

mothers voice

That’s my mother’s voice in my head talking. It’s nearly impossible to shut her up.

My next thought was The universe hates me.

universe hates me

The universe isn’t out to get me. That’s just silly.

I am just an insignificant speck in the scheme of things.

the-universe-you-are-here

The Universe doesn’t care a whit about me.

So, here I am feeling pretty sorry for myself.

pity party

How lame is that?

What I should really be feeling is grateful.

grateful

Grateful to have people in my life who wanted to celebrate with me.

Grateful to be alive.

At all.

be alive

And I am.

I am grateful to be here, for however much more time I am granted.

run down

Guess, I am just going to have to do something else worth celebrating.

Maybe write another book?

Or another half-dozen books?

desk

I better get started, huh?

Wish me luck!

prep

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“Do you really want to write a beach book?”

“Do you really want to write a beach book?”

was the question posed to me by an international best-selling crime fiction novelist in her writing workshop where participants read a few pages of their works in progress.

Her tone was accusatory.

slap cheek

Honestly, I felt like I’d just been slapped.

Hard. On both cheeks.

I’ve no doubt my face colored.

I was crestfallen. Every writer hopes for approval from authors they admire. Or at least, constructive criticism.

judged c

I felt judged as lacking.

I felt publicly shamed.

I don’t even know if I answered her.

I was just doing everything in my power to keep from bursting into tears.

meaningful

I tried very hard to hear what she was saying as meaningful feedback.

But she wasn’t critiquing my writing, but the content of my writing.

What I hadn’t realized at the time, was I was running into the great divide, previously unknown to me–

Literary versus Genre Fiction.

lit vs genre

And genre fiction, like my romantic time travel adventure novel, according to her was not worthy of wasting time writing.

(And isn’t crime fiction, genre fiction too? Well, not hers I guess.)

I’ve been writing poetry since I could hold a crayon. But that was okay, because poetry is considered literary?

poetry b

Call me naive, but I didn’t realize there was such animosity between literary writers and genre writers.

To me, good writing is good writing.

And I’ve always read both literary and genre fiction without placing any value judgment on the worthiness of either.

I like what I like. And I like a good story.

once upon

I like books that transport me to other worlds, other lives, other experiences than my own.

bradbury

Books that make me think, and feel, and understand something new.

kindred

Books that take me out of my own mental anguish and bring joy.

p and p

Both literary and genre fiction can do those things.

handmaid

So why decide one type of writing is better or more worthy than the other?

Why is only “literary” worthy or merit

and

who defines what is literary and what isn’t?

better

I wish I had stood up to that author.

I wish I had said, “All writing matters.”

proper lit

I wish I could go back in time, and say to that author who shamed me,

“Yes, I really want to write a beach book.”

And now I have.

I wrote the book I needed and wanted to write.

And I’m glad I did. Hopefully, some readers will be too.

FrontCover159BoxFlat

 

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Why I Love Time Travel

Growing up, we were a one TV household.

And believe it or not, until 1980 or so, that TV only had a black & white picture.

tv

When my parents weren’t home or weren’t watching, my older brother was in charge of the TV.

He loved science fiction. So I learned to love it too.

 

Saturday mornings meant 

Godzilla movies

godzilla

and space adventures like

Forbidden Planet

forbidden-planet

But of all the movies my brother and I watched,

this one fully captivated my imagination–

time machine movie

The 1960 film version of H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine.

 

From that moment on, I was hooked on Time Travel.

I borrowed the book from the library and devoured it.

time mach

And of course, my brother and I watched science fiction TV shows too!

Like 

time tunnel

&

baker

&

star trek orig

And you can probably guess my favorite episode–

city on edge

City on the Edge of Forever —

a time travel episode where Kirk must chose between love and saving history.

 

So why do I love time travel so much?

love tt

Because time travel is an opportunity to

learn from the past

and 

maybe even to right wrongs, 

as in my favorite time travel movie so far

back 2 future

Back to the Future!

Marty makes life better for his entire family–

after almost screwing it up that is.

future

Time Travel lets you see possible futures

and 

visit history. 

Colliers Illustrated Weekly 28/06/1952, pp. 20-21

And time travel can help a person learn to become his or her best self,

as in my new favorite time travel book,

11/22/63 by Stephen King

11 22 63

(and the book is way, way better than the show–give it a read!)

 

Time travel, for me though, is mostly about regret. 

rewind

The choices we regret making

and the chances we didn’t take.

regret

That’s why in my time travel novel, Time Flash: Another Me

FrontCover159BoxFlat

Sara Rodríguez Bloom García gets lots more chances to make things right. 

Second Chance Just Ahead Green Road Sign Over Dramatic Clouds and Sky.

But like most heroines, she’ll make things lots worse before they get better.

worse

Hopefully readers will enjoy the adventure of it all.

enjoy reading

And feel happy when they read how the story ends.

Concept of choice directions. Made in 3D.

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Failing Often Means I Keep Trying

I’ve loved words since I fell in love with my very first picture book at age 2–Prince Bertram the Bad by Arnold Lobel.

Prince Bertram even kind of looked a little like me.

Well his hair, anyway.

 prince

And falling in love with poetry happened a little while later, when I discovered a flood-stained volume of Kipling’s poems in my neighbor’s trash.

 kip

I read the poems aloud, and though I didn’t understand much at age 3, I felt their rhythms were a kind of magic. A musical incantation calling forth life.

But sometimes, these days, my head is too full of words.

Overwhelmed by news and media.

 too many

And I crave something creative to do with my hands that doesn’t call for words. 

hand bulb

So, some of you may know I was thinking about taking up crochet or knitting.

Something to do with my hands while watching Netflix that is more productive and less caloric than feeding my face with salty snacks.

Plus, pretty blankets.

crochet vs knit

Well, 17,000 hours of watching YouTube how-to videos later, and lots of salty snacks along the way…

I have officially failed at both.

Really, I gave it lots of effort.

Even sought real life advice from experts.

fail 2

But it’s something to do with my lack of manual dexterity.

An inability to tension the yarn.

Who knew it would be that hard?

Not me.

tension yarn

So what did I do?

I researched aids to help tension the yarn.

I discovered 5 different aids and tried them all.

Didn’t help.

fail 1

Now, I’ve always kind of known I’m a klutz.

Never could jump rope without getting tangled up.

I trip over invisible bumps in the sidewalk.

If there’s even one bit of ice, my foot finds it–and boom–down I go.

fail 3

But I refuse to give up all hope.

Stubborn that way.

Or maybe stupid.

Or determined.

Oftentimes, I can’t tell the difference and just keep plodding on.

And that’s a kind of success too.

fail 4

So, I’m coming for you afghan loom.

Who can’t twist yarn around a little peg, right?

Gonna find out.

afghan

I’ll check back in with you guys with or without afghan.

Let you see the results of this next try / fail opportunity.

Wish me luck! Please. I’m gonna need it.

Ideal many life failures thomas edison Google Search

 

 

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